Gratitude Lately

Lately I’ve been grateful for cactus flowers and how beautiful things can grow from sticky situations…

For honeybees and the wisdom of beekeepers who’ve spent years tending them…

For the company of family and how lovely it is when you can share passions with them…

For shared Zionism, and that we’ve been in this together since day 1…

For memories of times before smartphones, and how some people are constants in our lives…

For Twinkie-cousins…

And for a new type of work-life balance. The photo above is from my second week at a NEW JOB- the face is me realizing that I’m home at 5:30p after getting gasoline and a car wash. What is this life of luxury?

Pesach 2022

Somehow, and I do know exactly how, I didn’t end up with hardly any photos of our Seder(s) for 2022. Largely because I was too busy soaking it in. By it, I mean a Seder- not virtual, not cancelled– just an in-person, sharing food and wine, reading the Haggadah together, Seder.

Our family Seder was slightly delayed this year due to Covid. I don’t mean Covid in the abstract sense, I mean Scott and I were isolated for being Covid positive on the original date… so it ended up a little later and smaller than planned, but that’s ok. There was no way we were going to cancel altogether, not after the last 2 years.

One photo I did nab was this snapshot of the candles Mom bought in Safat especially for Passover. If you don’t know, safat candles are a *thing* and these were not only gorgeous, they literally did not drip. Contrast with the regular ol’ Shabbat candles I usually get from Kroger (which I used for my Aunt Cheryl’s Seder) which drip allllll over my candlesticks every time and inevitably lead to me standing over the sink with ice cubes and a butter knife trying to scrape the dried wax off the sticks, and, because I forgot to put down a plate or tin foil… the tablecloth.

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Israel Trip 2022: One Second at a Time

Tour overview (and places you might see in the video!): Valley of Elah, Tel Aviv-Yafo, Tel Megiddo (Armageddon), Mt Precipice in Nazareth, Mt Carmel, Haifa, Ohalei Rachamim, Rosh Hanikra, Safat, Sea of Galilee, Tabgha, Mount of Beatitudes, Tiberius, Capernaum, the Golan Heights, Valley of Tears, Magdala, Banias (Caesarea Philippi), the Yardenit (Jordan River), Bet She’an, Qumran, the Dead Sea, Masada, Ein Gedi, Jerusalem, the Mount of Olives, the Israel Museum, the hills outside Bethlehem, Hezekiah’s tunnel, the Pool of Siloam, the Burnt House, Western Wall (kotel) and Southern Steps, Yad Vashem, the Herzl Museum, Emek Tzurim Sifting Project, the Pool of Bethesda, Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Ammunition Hill, the Garden Tomb, the Elvis Cafe.

Video was created using the 1SE app. Music is from SoundStripe.

Altoid Tin Watercolors

Watercolor was never my favorite paint. When I was young I fell in love with the slow blending work of oil, but turpentine and work space limitations being what they are, I later transitioned to the beautiful imperfection of acrylics – usually with an element of mixed medium (metal foil, glue, papers, etc).

My Grandmother, however, prefers watercolors as her first choice. I once took a water color class with her as a child and I remember disliking the opaque nature of the paint (and ultimately, painting a grey cat far too thickly so it looked terribly muddy).

March 2, 2022

But now, time is of the essence. And quickly adding a bit of art to my day- in ten minutes, or even 5- is a highly desirable concept. Enter: the homemade Altoid tin watercolor studio.

My first painting “out and about” while getting sushi for lunch.

How to make a pocket-size watercolor studio: Buy an Altoids tin, a $1-2 watercolor palette and some cheap brushes. Glue the paints into the bottom of the tin, trim down the paintbrushes to also fit (I suggest using garden shears!), and cut watercolor paper into small rectangles. Voila! An art studio in your pocket.

No to War

Independent Russian news outlet TV Rain was forced to shut down on Thursday, March 3, 2022 due to the Russian government’s crackdown on local media stations broadcasting unfavorable coverage of the war in Ukraine. Journalists signed off by saying “no to war,” before walking off the station’s set.

The network then broadcast Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake, a nod to the 1991 coup attempt against the government of then-Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. As that coup was taking place, the ballet played repeatedly on television, an indication to viewers that something was wrong.

Gratitude Lately

Lately I’ve been grateful for morning stomps,
for Valentine’s Day roses,
For negative Covid tests,
For family movie nights,
For bottles of glitter and my Friday crafting buddy,
For new hairdos perfectly accessorized,
And for baby dolphins.

2022 seems to be flying by already!